Title Index

This webpage indexes articles and papers according to the works by Cooper with which they are particularly concerned. Only those that deal extensively with specific works or groups of works are included here.

ecognized Groups of Cooper Works

Listed here are papers and articles dealing with groups of Cooper works, generally or specifically. For papers or articles dealing only with specific books within a group, click on the appropriate title. (We have not tried to list individually the many books within the Indian and Frontier and the Sea categories.)

All Cooper’s Fiction

  • Axelrad, Allan M. (University of Pennsylvania), History and Utopia: A Study of the World View of James Fenimore Cooper. Norwood, PA: Norwood Editions, 1978. (x, 231 p.) Copyright © 1978 by Allan M. Axelrad, and placed online with his permission. A major and provocative study of Cooper’s intellectual and religious views, as reflected in a detailed study of his novels and other writings. [Especially detailed treatment of The Bravo and The Crater]
  • Walker, Warren S., Plots and Characters in the Fiction of James Fenimore Cooper. Archon Books/Dawson, 1978. (xi, 346 p.) © 1978, Warren S. Walker, and placed online with his permission. Detailed analysis of the plots of each of Cooper’s novels and short stories.

he Leatherstocking Tales

(The Pioneers, The Last of the Mohicans, The Prairie, The Pathfinder, The Deerslayer)

he Effingham Novels

([The Pioneers], Homeward Bound, Home as Found)

he Littlepage Novels

(Satanstoe, The Chainbearer, The Redskins)

Indian and Frontier Novels

he Otsego Novels

(The Pioneers, [Homeward Bound], Home as Found, The Deerslayer, Wyandotté)

Sea Stories

he European Novels

(The Bravo, The Heidenmauer, The Headsman)

  • Denne, Constance Ayers (Baruch College, City University of New York), Cooper’s Use of Setting in the European Trilogy. Settings in The Bravo, The Heidenmauer, and The Headsman as artistic keys to Cooper’s meaning.
  • Phinit-Akson, Helen [Dr. Helen James] (Thammasat University, Bangkok, Thailand), Ritual and Aesthetics: The Influence of Europe on the Art of Fenimore Cooper. Bangkok: Thammasat University Press, 1976. 114 p. Placed online with permission of the author. Detailed and sympathetic exploration of Cooper’s profound and orthodox Christian religious beliefs, centered on faith and redemption, as expounded in eight novels: The Wept of Wish-ton-Wish, The Bravo, The Heidenmauer, The Headsman, The Wing-and-Wing, Mercedes of Castile, The Oak Openings, and The Sea Lions.

he Travel Books

(Gleanings in Europe: France, Italy, England, Switzerland, The Rhine {Switzerland, Part II})

Individual Works

Fiction

ovels

820 recaution
1821 he Spy
1823 he Pioneers [Leatherstocking Tales] [The Otsego Novels]
1823 he Pilot
1825 ionel Lincoln
1826 he Last of the Mohicans [Leatherstocking Tales]
1827 he Prairie [Leatherstocking Tales]
1828 he Red Rover
1829 The Wept of Wish-ton-Wish
1830 he Water-Witch
1831 he Bravo [See also under European Novels]
  • Axelrad, Allan M. (University of Pennsylvania), History and Utopia: A Study of the World View of James Fenimore Cooper. Norwood, PA: Norwood Editions, 1978. (x, 231 p.) Copyright © 1978 by Allan M. Axelrad, and placed online with his permission. A major and provocative study of Cooper’s intellectual and religious views, as reflected in a detailed study of his novels and other writings. [Extensive discussion of The Bravo]
  • Cooper, James Fenimore, A Letter to His Countrymen. Cooper angrily attacks American press reviews of The Bravo and The Heidenmauer; presents theory of limited Constitutional powers and dangers of legislative usurpation; and says he will quit writing.
  • Cooper, Susan Fenimore, Introductions [Pages and Pictures (1861)]
  • Lampe, David (Buffalo State University), Gothic Cooper: The Shaping of The Bravo. Cooper’s debt to the Gothic “outlaw” tradition, as reflected in Friedrich Schiller’s Die Rauber [The Robbers] and Johann Heinrich Zschokke’s Abaellino, der grosse Bandit [The Bravo of Venice].
  • MacDougall, Hugh (James Fenimore Cooper Society), The Bravo: Cooper’s Message to America. The totalitarian Venetian aristocracy exposed as a warning against economic corporate aristocracy in America.
  • Ringe, Donald A. (University of Kentucky), The Bravo: Social Criticism in the Gothic Mode. Brilliant use of Gothic literary style to depict a Republic reduced to totalitarian terr commercial greed; 18ᵗʰ century Venice in history; America (??) in the future.
  • Sappenfield, James A. (University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee), Editing James Fenimore Cooper. Theory, challenges, and limitations in the textual editing of the Cooper Edition, especially The Last of the Mohicans, The Two Admirals, and The Bravo.
  • Scannavini, Anna (Università dell’Aquila). Typographies of Writing in The Bravo. Cooper’s understanding and use of pre-unification Italian dialects, including that of Venice, in the novel.
  • Schachterle, Lance (Worcester Polytechnic Institute), Cooper, Style and The Bravo. Cooper’s writing style and its sources; studies of Cooper’s style; and (in great detail) an examination of his writing style in The Bravo. [Keynote Address]
  • Schachterle, Lance (Worcester Polytechnic Institute). The ‘soulless corporation’ in Venice, England, France, and America: Cooper’s The Bravo (1831). Government’s tendency, in England, France, and perhaps America, to become a “soulless” aristocracy devoted to its own interests.
1832 he Heidenmauer [See also under European Novels]
  • Cooper, James Fenimore, A Letter to His Countrymen. Cooper angrily attacks American press reviews of The Bravo and The Heidenmauer; presents theory of limited Constitutional powers and dangers of legislative usurpation; and says he will quit writing.
  • MacDougall, Hugh C. (James Fenimore Cooper Society), Examining Man’s “Latent Sympathies” in The Heidenmauer. A morality tale about the frailties of men who are neither all good nor all bad.
  • Redekop, Ernest H. (University of Western Ontario), Cooper’s Emblems of History. Using landscape to portray history in The Last of the Mohicans, Satanstoe, The Heidenmauer, and The Crater (in the last, Thomas Cole’s “The Course of Empire”).
1833 he Headsman [See also under European Novels]
1835 he Monikins
1838 omeward Bound [Effingham Novels]
  • Arch, Steven (Michigan State University), Cooper: The Arabesque and the Grotesque. Grotesque and Arabesque, especially in The Monikins (the whole Antarctic portion) and Homeward Bound (the North African castaways portion).
  • Cooper, Susan Fenimore, Introduction [Pages and Pictures (1861)]
  • Franklin, Wayne (Northeastern University), Cooper as Passenger. The American Neptune, Vol. 57, No. 4 (Fall 1997), pp. 351-357. How Cooper’s favored status as a Captain’s protegé on the Stirling in 1806-07 affected his attitudes towards the sea both in his life and in novels such as Homeward Bound. (1838).
  • Harthorn, Steven P. (University of Tennessee, Knoxville), The Tortured Profession of Authorship: Novelist Again. Chapter 1 of James Fenimore Cooper, Professional Authorship, and the American Literary Marketplace, 1838-1851. Doctoral dissertation, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, 2005. Cooper’s controversial re-entry into the realm of fiction-writing with Homeward Bound and Home as Found after his supposed “retirement” in 1834; his exploration of the ethics of authorship in his 1838 Knickerbocker Magazine critique of Sir Walter Scott.
  • McWilliams, John (Middlebury College), Bragging and Dodge-ing in America, or Domestic Manners As Found. Cooper’s dismay at American manners in the 1830s, as reflected in Homeward Bound and Home as Found.
  • Schachterle, Lance (Worcester Polytechnic Institute), “I am condemned to remain Eve Effingham for life”: Home as Bound. For all her liberality, the contentment Eve “finds” at “Home” is one of isolation within Templeton.
  • Zeitvogel, Chuck (State University of New York College at Brockport), Gender Power and Social Class: The Role of Women in James Fenimore Cooper’s The Pathfinder, Homeward Bound, Home as Found and The Ways of the Hour. In these works, “Female characters are only allowed to wield power in small, enclosed spaces, or in life or death situations. ... Male characters ... control all social space and political power.” Master of Arts Thesis, Brockport, November 2004.
1838 ome as Found [Effingham Novels] [The Otsego Novels]
1840 he Pathfinder [Leatherstocking Tales]
1840 ercedes of Castile
  • Harthorn, Steven P. (University of Tennessee), Truth and Consequences: James Fenimore Cooper on Scott, Columbus, Bumppo, and Professional Authorship. Cooper’s assertions of dishonesty in Walter Scott, and his claims to veracity in Mercedes of Castille and The Deerslayer.
  • Madison, Robert D. (United States Naval Academy), Cooper’s Columbus. Irving had already written a definitive narrative of Columbus’ voyage; in Mercedes of Castile, Cooper tried and failed to tell the story in dialogue.
  • Phinit-Akson, Helen [Dr. Helen James] (Thammasat University, Bangkok, Thailand), Ritual and Aesthetics: The Influence of Europe on the Art of Fenimore Cooper. Bangkok: Thammasat University Press, 1976. 114 p. Placed online with permission of the author. Detailed and sympathetic exploration of Cooper’s profound and orthodox Christian religious beliefs, centered on faith and redemption, as expounded in eight novels: The Wept of Wish-ton-Wish, The Bravo, The Heidenmauer, The Headsman, The Wing-and-Wing, Mercedes of Castile, The Oak Openings, and The Sea Lions.
1841 he Deerslayer [Leatherstocking Tales] [The Otsego Novels]
1842 he Two Admirals
1842 he Wing-and-Wing
1843 yandotté [The Otsego Novels]
1844 float and Ashore
1844 iles Wallingford
1845 atanstoe [The Littlepage Novels]
1845 he Chainbearer [The Littlepage Novels]
1846 he Redskins [The Littlepage Novels]
1847 he Crater
1848 ack Tier
  • Cooper, Susan Fenimore, Introductions [Pages and Pictures (1861) and Household Edition (1881-84)]
  • Harthorn, Steven P. (University of Tennessee, Knoxville), Periodical Publication: Cooper and Graham’s Magazine. Chapter 4 of James Fenimore Cooper, Professional Authorship, and the American Literary Marketplace, 1838-1851. Doctoral dissertation, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, 2005. Cooper’s experiments with magazine writing and his experiences in publishing his “Sketches of Naval Men” (Lives of Distinguished American Naval Officers), Autobiography of a Pocket-Handkerchief, and Islets of the Gulf (Jack Tier).
  • Lampe, David (Buffalo State University), Gender on the Rocks: Cooper’s Jack Tier, or the Florida Reef. Treatment of gender, humorous and otherwise, in Jack Tier and in The Red Rover.
  • Walker, Jeffrey (Oklahoma State University). Reading Rose Budd; Or, Tough Sledding in Jack Tier. Cooper tackles serial installment writing, with changing titles and plans.
1848 he Oak Openings
1849 he Sea Lions
1850 he Ways of the Hour

ther Fiction

1823 ales for Fifteen [two short stories, Imagination and Heart]

1832 “No Steamboats” [short story — in French]

1843 utobiography of a Pocket-Handkerchief [novelette]

  • Harthorn, Steven P. (University of Tennessee, Knoxville), Cooper’s Autobiography of a Pocket-Handkerchief as a Defense of Authorship. This work marks a change in Cooper’s authorial style to the first person, and despite the unusual narrator may in some respects be considered as symbolically autobiographical in fact.
  • Harthorn, Steven P. (University of Tennessee, Knoxville), Periodical Publication: Cooper and Graham’s Magazine. Chapter 4 of James Fenimore Cooper, Professional Authorship, and the American Literary Marketplace, 1838-1851. Doctoral dissertation, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, 2005. Cooper’s experiments with magazine writing and his experiences in publishing his “Sketches of Naval Men” (Lives of Distinguished American Naval Officers), Autobiography of a Pocket-Handkerchief, and Islets of the Gulf (Jack Tier).

1848 pside Down [play]

1850 he Lake Gun [short story]

on-fiction

1828 otions of the Americans [major study of American culture]

1831 Letter to General Lafayette [American finances]

1831 Contributions for the Poles

1834 A Letter to His Countrymen [complaints of the author]

c.1836 he Eclipse, published posthumously in 1869 [short essay]

  • Wallace, James D. (Boston College), Cooper on Corporal Punishment. Flogging, whether at sea or of a slave, is morally corrupting to the flogger.

1836 leanings in Europe: Switzerland, original title Sketches of Switzerland [The Travel Books]

1836 leanings in Europe: The Rhine, original title Sketches of Switzerland. Part Second [The Travel Books]

  • Daly, Robert (University of Buffalo), Cooper’s Stoic Cosmopolitanism: Gleanings in Switzerland. In Gleanings in Europe: Switzerland and Gleanings in Europe: The Rhine, we see how, besides the glorious Alps, Cooper also gradually found a nation that could be both diverse and united; with references to recent philosophical writings by Brian Boyd, Julia Kristeva, Toril Moi, Alain Badiou, and Quentin Meillassoux.

1837 leanings in Europe: France, original title Gleanings in Europe [The Travel Books]

1837 leanings in Europe: England [The Travel Books]

  • Schachterle, Lance (Worcester Polytechnic Institute), Cooper’s Attitude toward England. Cooper’s complex reactions, reflected in Notions of the Americans, Gleanings in Europe: England, and, much more ambiguously, in his fiction.

1838 leanings in Europe: Italy [The Travel Books]

1838 he American Democrat [political science]

1838 he Chronicles of Cooperstown [local history]

1839 he History of the Navy of the United States of America [major naval history]

1843 Ned Myers [biography]

c.1845 The Battle of Plattsburgh Bay, published posthumously in 1869 [lecture]

1844 The Cruise of the Somers [naval article]

c.1845 Old Ironsides, published posthumously in 1853 [naval article]

1846 ives of Distinguished American Naval Officers [biographies]

1851 ew York [introduction to uncompleted history of New York City, to be called The Towns of Manhattan]

1852 merican and European Scenery Compared [essay in The Home Book of the Picturesque: or, American Scenery, Art, and Literature (New-York: G.P. Putnam, 1852), pp. 51-69]

  • Ravage, Jessie A. (Independent Scholar, Cooperstown), The Home Book of the Picturesque : Father and Daughter. In this 1852 anthology, JFC’s academic essay “American and European Scenery Compared” contrasts with SFC’s more personal and place-specific “A Dissolving View,” which prefigures realistic American regional sketches.